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Prevention of Alcohol Use in Older Teens

Prevention of Alcohol Use in Older Teens

The growing incidence of alcohol use among teens is an important public health problem. In a recent publication in Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, Klein Buendel Senior Scientists, Dr. David Buller and Dr. Gill Woodall, joined multiple co-authors to report on the effects of a new alcohol use prevention program for older teenagers. The program is called Smart Choices 4 Teens. The paper reports the results from a randomized controlled trial assessing the impact of this online, interactive, family-based alcohol prevention program with over 400 families on preventing and reducing teen alcohol use.

Smart Choices 4 Teens was designed with three sequential components: general parent-teen communication, teen alcohol use, and teen romantic relationships. The creators adapted two evidence-based programs — Family Matter (1) and Parent Handbook (2) — to appeal to older teens and their parents. Communication skills training was incorporated through videos and interactive activities. The program was designed to have parents and teens go through the online activities separately and then complete a discussion activity together at the end of each component. The Alcohol Component is the focus of this publication.

Use of the program varied across families and components. Families that used more of the program reported better outcomes. Data related to dosage of the program and changes in drinking rates are reported in detail in the paper. Many positive effects were seen at 6-month and 12-month follow-ups with participating families. For example, teens in the experimental group reported fewer friends who had been drunk at six months, and parents in the experimental group reported more communication about social host laws. At 12 months, parents in the experimental group reported consuming fewer alcoholic beverages.

Overall, the findings suggest that Smart Choices 4 Teens was beneficial for families, especially when parents and teens completed more of the program. The authors believe that dissemination and implementation strategies that motivate completion of Smart Choice 4 Teens content, especially the Alcohol Component, can improve outcomes related to older teens’ alcohol use.

A full description of the methods, results, and conclusions of this study can be found in Psychology of Addictive Behaviors. This research was funded by a grant to the Prevention Research Center at the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (AA020977; Brenda Miller, Principal Investigator). Authors in addition to Dr. Miller, Dr. Buller, and Dr. Woodall include first author Dr. Hilary Byrnes, Dr. Joel Grube, Dr. Beth Bourdeau, and Dr. Meme Wang-Schweig from the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation. The Smart Choices 4 Teens program was produced by Klein Buendel’s Creative Team.

References

  1. Bauman, K. E., Foshee, V. A., Ennett, S. T., Hicks, K., & Pemberton, M. (2001). Family Matters: A family-directed program designed to prevent adolescent tobacco and alcohol use. Health Promotion Practice, 2, 81-96. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/152483990100200112
  2. Turrisi, R., Jaccard, J., Taki, R., Dunnam, H., & Grimes, J. (2001). Examination of the short-term efficacy of a parent intervention to reduce college student drinking tendencies. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, 15, 366–372. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0893-164X.15.4.366
Use of Media and Social Media in the Prevention of Substance Use

Use of Media and Social Media in the Prevention of Substance Use

Three Klein Buendel Senior Scientists have authored a chapter in a new 2019 book, Prevention of Substance Use, published by Springer. The chapter titled, “Use of Media and Social Media in the Prevention of Substance Use,” was written by Dr. David Buller, Dr. Barbara Walkosz, and Dr. W. Gill Woodall.

Mass media have changed dramatically over the past 25 years, yet still remain an important channel for substance abuse prevention messages (e.g., alcohol, tobacco, marijuana). Exposure to messaging is an important issue for campaigns. This book chapter describes how online and social media have added new media platforms for substance abuse campaigns. Overall, evaluations of web-based interventions show some promise for substance abuse prevention, although the effects appear modest. Less is known about the effectiveness of social media in substance abuse campaigns, especially the influence of user-generated content and commercial advertising.

The chapter describes several recent changes that have revolutionized the media. These include the birth of the Internet, the emergence of new media (including web-based intervention and social media) that has made content available on-demand, and the introduction of mobile computing that has vastly changed connectivity, reach, and engagement. Each of these developments raises questions (which the authors explore) about the influence of new media on substance abuse campaigns and challenges for conducting research on the effects of prevention intervention delivery. The book chapter delves into the role of audience activity, starting with audience exposure determined by selective attention, exposure, and retention, and moving on to examine user-generated content in the new media environment.

The emergence of new media holds promise for future substance abuse prevention campaigns but comes with a number of challenges that are explored in the chapter. These include (1) the fact that theories of social media impact are not well developed; (2) the development of effective methodologies to measure and assess the effects of emerging media; (3) the determination of how commercial online marketing strategies influence substance use and how social marketing approaches can use similar strategies for prevention; (4) the need to understand the use of multiple platforms for promotion (e.g., broadcast, print, online media); (5) the determination of how best to leverage and encourage user-generated media for substance abuse interventions; and (6) the need to explore the interactive nature of emerging media more fully. The authors suggest that these challenges represent tremendous opportunites to better understand and more effectively impact many different populations for the improvement of their health.

Book Citation

Z. Sloboda, R. Hingson, and H. Petras (Eds.), Prevention of substance use. New York: Springer, 2019.

Insights About HPV Vaccination in the United States from Mothers on Facebook

Insights About HPV Vaccination in the United States from Mothers on Facebook

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the most common sexually transmitted infection is the human papillomavirus (HPV) but only about half of girls and less than 40% of boys in the United States have received all the recommended doses of the HPV vaccine (1). In a recent e-publication in Human Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics, Klein Buendel Senior Scientists, Dr. David Buller and Barbara Walkosz, and Project Manager, Julia Berteletti, and coauthors provide insights on HPV vaccination in the United States from mothers’ comments on Facebook posts in a randomized trial. The study evaluated responses from mothers of teenage girls living in various U.S. states in relation to HPV vaccine health and related information posted to private groups on Facebook.

A large number of mothers of 14-17-year-old girls joined private groups on Facebook where a variety of health information relevant to adolescent girls was posted daily. Topics included indoor tanning, mother-daughter communication, and HPV vaccinations. Posts discussing HPV vaccination were posted in each of the groups and ranged from didactic messages (e.g., the need for adolescent vaccines, how well HPV vaccines are working to decrease infection rate, number of parents choosing to vaccinate children against HPV, etc.) to narrative posts about women who have died from cervical cancer. Posts also included a link to an article, video, photograph, or an infographic.

Comments by participants were generally more favorable toward HPV vaccination than unfavorable. Mothers’ comments are further described in the journal article.

A strength of the analyses identifying participant pre-existing characteristics before posting the HPV messages on Facebook, therefore being able to show that HPV vaccination was a predictor of commenting behavior with mothers who had not vaccinated their daughters as the unfavorable commenters. It is noted that many of the mothers who did not comment had daughters that were vaccinated for HPV. A possible weakness of the study was that the sample of mothers may have limited generalizability. Authors conclude by stating that the fact that many mothers who had daughters vaccinated against HPV did not comment on the HPV posts could contribute to the idea that opposition to the HPV vaccine is larger than it is in actuality. Authors also suggest that U.S. public health agencies and practitioners need to find ways to dispel myths and provide information on vaccine safety and concerns, including that many mothers choose to vaccinate their daughters against HPV.

This research was funded by a grant to Klein Buendel from the National Cancer Institute (CA192652; Dr. David Buller, Principal Investigator). Additional authors include Dr. Sherry Pagoto and Jessica Bibeau from University of Connecticut, Dr. Katie Baker and Dr. Joel Hillhouse from East Tennessee State University, and Dr. Kimberly Henry from Colorado state University.

References

  1. Sexually transmitted disease surveillance 2017: other STDs. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Web site. Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/std/stats17/other.htm#hpv. Accessed March 28, 2019.
Development of Educational Modules to Enhance Care of Aged and Dying Inmates

Development of Educational Modules to Enhance Care of Aged and Dying Inmates

The United States has the highest rate of incarceration in the world and the demographics of the prison inmate population are shifting and aging. Many older adults are serving extended sentences and will age and die in place — making geriatric and end-of-life care an essential educational foci for prison staff. Consequently, resources are needed to adequately prepare prison staff to address this growing concern.

In a recent publication in Public Health Nursing, a research team led by Dr. Susan Loeb from Penn State University and including Klein Buendel (KB) Senior Scientist, Dr. Valerie Myers, reports on the development of educational modules to enhance the care of aged and dying inmates in prisons. The article describes the strategies used to “set-up” the Enhancing Care for the Aged and Dying in Prisons (ECAD-P) educational modules. “Set-up” is the first of four phases in the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) Framework for Going to Full Scale, which served as the conceptual framework for this study. Objectives achieved during the Set-up phase include: (a) establishing an approach for infusing the intervention into the target system; (b) identifying the product that needs scaling-up; and (c) determining what will be accomplished in the full-scale phase. Also, program buy-in within the given context and identification of the test sites, as well as support by early adopters, are essential.

The design approach for the educational modules included an environmental scan, a modified Delphi study, and a usability study.

An environmental scan provided a foundational understanding of the complex, contextual factors that impact correctional settings in the United States. Specifically, the environmental scan of diverse correctional settings helped to determine current educational approaches, education and learning preferences of personnel, and the technological capacity to deliver computer-based educational modules. Gaining knowledge was essential for the targeted development of modules that are tailored to address the health needs of the growing numbers of older inmates, many of whom will remain incarcerated through their end of life.

The Delphi process uses iterative group facilitation to forge reliable consensus on the opinion of experts through a series of structured questionnaires or rounds. The goal is to secure expert judgment based on experience. A Delphi survey was conducted early in the Set-Up phase to identify essential geriatric content for integration into the new prototype learning modules. The outcome was a reliable consensus on essential geriatric content for inclusion into the newly rebranded ECAD-P modules. An Expert Advisory Board reviewed the findings and validated the results.

For the usability assessment, the research team collaborated to design and program three media-rich, interactive computer-based prototype modules designed for the corrections context. The prototype, containing three modules, was built using Axure development software. The prototype was self-contained on a laptop computer. Each module had learning objectives, content delivered through multiple interactive features (for example: drag and drop, hover, click and reveal, video) and a final comprehension check quiz. Usability and acceptability testing were assessed following an established protocol examine navigability, detect problems, observe time spent solving problems, identify problem severity, and develop recovery strategies. After usability testing, the participants completed the System Usability Scale, a validated tool for assessing the usability and acceptability of technology-based products. Testing was conducted with 16 participants at two state correctional institutions in one mid-Atlantic state.

A full description of the methods, results, conclusions, and limitations of this study, as well as the implications for public health nursing, can be found in Public Health Nursing. This research was funded by a Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) grant to KB from the National Institute on Aging at the National Institutes of Health (AG049570; Dr. Susan Loeb, Principal Investigator). Other collaborators/coauthors include Dr. Janice Penrod, Dr. Erin Kitt-Lewis, Dr. Rachel Wion, and Brenda Baney from Penn State University; and Sophia Strickfaden from Johnson & Wales University. KB’s Creative Team produced the ECAD-P prototype modules.

A Year of Research and Outreach

A Year of Research and Outreach

This was a very productive year for Klein Buendel (KB). In 2018, our scientists and staff:

  • Competed successfully for 4 new prime grant and subcontract research awards;
  • Completed 7 prime and subcontract research projects;
  • Presented research findings at 17 local, national, and international conferences and expert meetings; a total of 34 presentations, panel discussions, and posters; and
  • Published 20 research manuscripts in peer-reviewed journals.

It was also a very exciting year because KB was one of three North American sponsors and organizers of the 4th International Conference on UV and Skin Cancer Prevention. KB co-sponsored the conference with Ryerson University in Toronto, Ontario, Canada and the Canadian Dermatology Society. The conference was held in Toronto on May 1-4, 2018.

And KB celebrated it’s Sweet 16th Birthday in June!

Additional highlights of our 2018 research publications, conference presentations, and outreach activities are listed below. Publications may include manuscripts that were in press or published in electronic format last year. The names of KB investigators and staff are bolded.

Publications

Loeb SJ, Penrod J, Myers VH, Baney BL, Strickfaden SM, Kitt-Lewis E, Wion RK. Enhancing Care of Aged and Dying Prisoners: Is e-Learning a Feasible Approach? J Forensic Nurs. 2017 Dec;13(4):178-185.

Cochrane SK, Chen SH, Fitzgerald JD, Dodson JA, Fielding RA, King AC, McDermott MM, Manini TM, Marsh AP, Newman AB, Pahor M, Tudor-Locke C, Ambrosius WT, Buford TW; LIFE Study Research Group. Association of Accelerometry-Measured Physical Activity and Cardiovascular Events in Mobility-Limited Older Adults: The LIFE (Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders) Study. J Am Heart Assoc. 2017 Dec 2;6(12).

Wang-Schweig M, Miller BA, Buller DB, Byrnes HF, Bourdeau B, Rogers V. Using panel vendors for recruitment into a web-based family prevention program: methodological consideration. Evaluation and the Health Professions. 2017 Jan 1: 163278717742189. doi: 10.1177/0163278717742189. [Epub ahead of print]

Berteletti J, Buller DB, Massie K, Ashley J, Liu X, & Reynolds, KR. Sun protection policies in public school districts with elementary schools in California. JAMA Dermatol. 2018 Jan 1;154(1):103-105.

Buller DB, Reynolds KD, Berteletti J, Massie K, Ashley J, Buller MK, Meenan RT. Accuracy of principal and teacher knowledge of school district policies on sun protection in California elementary schools. Prev Chronic Dis. 2018 Jan 18;15:E07. doi: 10.5888/pcd15.170342.

Gellar AC, Jablonski NG, Pagoto SL, Hay JL, Hillhouse J, Buller DB, Kenney L, Robinson JK, Weller RB, Moreno MA, Gilchrest BA, Sinclair C, Arndt J, Taber JM, Morris KL, Dwyer LA, Perna FM, Klein WMP, Suls J. Interdisciplinary perspectives on sun safety. JAMA Derm. 2018; 154(1):88-92.

Buller DB, Heckman CJ, Manne SL. The potential of behavioral counseling to prevent skin cancer. JAMA Dermatol. 2018 May;154(5):516-521.

Buller DB, Walkosz BJ, Buller MK, Wallis A, Andersen PA, Scott MD, Eye R, Liu X, & Cutter GR. Results of a randomized trial on an intervention promoting adoption of occupational sun protection policies. Am J of Health Promot. 2018 May;32(4):1042-1053.

Hay JL, Zielaskowski K, White KM, Kaphingst K, Robers E, Guest D, Sussman A, Talamantes Y, Schwartz M, Rodriguez VM, Li Y, Schofield E, Bigney J, Hunley K, Buller D, Berwick M. Interest and uptake of MC1R testing for melanoma risk in a diverse primary care population: a randomized clinical trial. JAMA Dermatol. 2018 Jun 1;154(6):684-693.

Walkosz BJ, Buller D, Buller M, Wallis A, Meenan R, Cutter G, Anderson P, Scott M. Sun Safe Workplaces: effects of an occupational skin cancer prevention program in employee sun safety practices. J Occup Environ Med. 2018 Nov;60(11):900-997.

Buller DB, Woodall WG, Saltz R, Grayson A, Buller MK. Implementation and Effectiveness of an Online Responsible Vendor Training for Recreational Marijuana Stores in Colorado, Oregon, and Washington State. J Public Health Manag Pract. 2018 Aug 31. [Epub ahead of print]

Nostrati A, Pimentel MA, Falzone A, Hegde R, Goel S, Chren M, Eye R, Linos E, Pagoto S, Walkosz BJ. Skin cancer prevention messages on Facebook: likes, shares and comments. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2018 Sep;79(3):582-585.

Kasting ML, Christy SM, Sutton SK, Lake P, Malo TL, Roetzheim RG, Schechtman T, Zimet GD, Walkosz BJ, Salmon D, Kahn JA, Giuliano AR, Vadaparampil ST. Florida Physicians’ Reported use of AFIX-Based Strategies for Human Papillomavirus Vaccination. Prev Med. 2018 Sep 13. pii: S0091-7435(18)30282-2. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2018.09.004. [Epub ahead of print]

Buller MK, Andersen P, Bettinghaus EP, Liu X, Slater MD, Henry K, Fluharty L, Fullmer S, Buller DB. Randomized Trial Evaluating Targeted Photographic Health Communication Messages in Three Stigmatized Populations: Physically-disabled, Senior, and Overweight/Obese Individuals. Journal of Health Communication. 2018;23(10-11):886-898.

Woodall WG, Starling R, Saltz RF, Buller DB, Stanghetta P. Results of a randomized trial of web-based retail onsite responsible beverage service training: Waytoserve.org. Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs. 2018 Sept;79(5):672-679.

Woodall WG, Starling R, Saltz RF, Buller DB, Stanghetta P. Responses to Commentaries by Miller (2018) and Buvik and Rossow (2018). J Stud Alcohol Drugs. 2018 Sep;79(5):684-685.

Buller DB, Walkosz BJ, Buller MK, Wallis A, Andersen PA, Scott MD, Meenan RT, Cutter GR. Implementation of occupational sun safety at a two-year follow-up in a randomized trial: comparison of sun safe workplaces policy intervention to attention control. American Journal of Health Promotion. 2018 Nov 26:890117118814398. doi: 10.1177/0890117118814398. [Epub ahead of print]

Kitt-Lewis E, Loeb SJ, Myers VH, Wion RK, Baney B, Strickfaden S. Developing training to enhance care of aged and dying inmates: set-up phase. Public Health Nursing. In press.

Byrnes HF, Miller BA, Grube JW, Bourdeau B, Buller DB, Wang-Schweig M, Woodall WG. Prevention of alcohol use in older teens: A randomized trial of an online family prevention program. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors. In press.

Buller MK, Bettinghaus EP, Fluharty L, Andersen PA, Slater MD, Henry KL, Liu X, Fullmer S, Buller DB. Improving health communication with photographic images that increase identification in three minority populations. Health Ed Res. In press.

Conference Presentations

NASPA Well-being and Health Promotion Leadership Conference — January 18-20 in Portland, Oregon
Myers VH, Newton RL, Jerrod T. Healthy Detours: A location-based services app to promote healthy choices among college students. (presentation)

University of Alabama Birmingham School of Medicine Center for Exercise Medicine’s Distinguished Lecture Series — March 13 in Birmingham, Alabama
Myers V. Caminemos Juntas: A Location-Based Smartphone App for Latinas to Connect with Nearby Walking Partners. (presentation)

Eastern Nursing Research Society Annual Meeting — April 11-13 in Newark, New Jersey
• Loeb SJ, Kitt-Lewis E, Myers VH. Development of Computer-based Training for Inmate Caregivers through Nursing Science and Technological Innovations. (presentation)

Society of Behavioral Medicine Annual Meeting — April 11-14 in New Orleans, Louisiana
Berteletti J, Strickfaden S, Woodall WG, Starling R, Zimet G, Stupiansky N, Chilton L. BeVaccinated: Designing a web app to promote teen vaccination uptake. (poster)
Buller D, Walkosz B, Buller MK, Wallis A, Meenan R, Liu X. Moderators of implementation of occupational sun protection policy by public-sector employers in a randomized trial. (presentation)
• Goldstein C, Alshurafa N, Spruijt-Metz D, Thomas G, Jake Schoffman D, Goldstein S, Wac K, Myers V. The Digital Health Council & ETCD present perspectives on effective digital health training in behavioral medicine. (panel discussion)
• Jackson J, Castro Sweet C, Coa K, Foster G, Matacotta J, Myers V, Place S, Keefe B, Osborn C, Wolin K. Speed networking your career options: Non-academic paths for behavior scientists. (panel discussion)
• McLeod D, Myers V, Stetson B, Sheean P. Nuts and Bolts: A practical Q&A about your education and career trajectory. (panel discussion)
Myers V, Loeb SJ, Kitt-Lewis E, Jerrod T, Strickfaden S, Wion RK. What works in corrections: Front-line insights on computer-based training. (poster)
Myers VH, Hudson H, Jerrod T, Strickfaden S, Buller M, Lippert M. Pinpoint: Gaming technology to engage adolescent sickle cell patients in precision pain management. (poster)
• Pagoto S, Berteletti J, Walkosz B, Oleski J, Palumbo A, Baker K, Hillhouse J, Henry K, Buller D. Delivering health promotion interventions on social media: Engagement and methodological considerations. (panel discussion)
• Reynolds K, Buller D, Berteletti J, Massie K, Ashley J, Buller MK, Meenan R. Correlates of sun safe policy implementation among elementary schools. (poster)
• Newton RL, Myers V, Carter L, Griffith D. A Mobile Phone-based physical activity maintenance app for African American men: MobileMen. (presentation)

Patient Centered Outcomes Research 8th Annual Symposium – April 24-25 2018 in St. Louis, Missouri
Buller DB. Precision Skin Cancer Prevention: A Sun Safety Mobile App. (presentation)

4th International Conference on UV and Skin Cancer Prevention – May 1-4, 2018 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Buller D. A Facebook Intervention to Reduce mothers’ Permissiveness for Indoor Tanning: Health Chat. (presentation)
• Meenan RT, Buller DB, Reynolds KD, Massie K, Berteletti J, Buller MK, Ashley J. Costs of Sun Protection Policy Implementation in California School Districts. (presentation)
• Meenan R, Buller D, Walkosz B, Eye R, Buller M, Wallis A. Estimated Cost of Occupational Sun Protection Policy Intervention Delivery to Public-Sector Employers. (presentation)
• Massie K, Berteletti J, Freeth B, Ashley J, Buller MK, Buller DB, Reynolds KD. Implementation Strategies: Review of a Sun Safety Program in California. (poster)
Walkosz B, Dellavalle R, Buller M, Buller D, Eye R, Olivas S. Formative Research to Develop Sun Safety Ink!, a Skin Cancer Prevention Training Program for Tattoo Artists. (presentation)

International Communication Association Annual Meeting — May 24-28 in Prague, Czech Republic
Woodall WG, Berteletti J, Starling R, Zimet G, Stupainsky N, Kong A, Chilton L. Usability testing of a web app to improve adolescent vaccination: Be Vaccinated. (presentation)
Walkosz B, Buller D, Buller MK, Wallis A, Meenan R, Scott M, Andersen P, Cutter G. Sun Safe Workplaces: Effect of a communication theory-based occupational skin cancer prevention program on employee sun safety practices. (presentation)

UNESCO International Conference on the Tangible and Intangible Impact of Information and Communication in the Digital Age — June 4-8 in Khanty-Mansiysk, Russia
Walkosz B. Emerging Issues in Media Literacy in the 21st Century. (presentation)

National Cancer Institute Cancer Center HPV Vaccination Meeting – June 7-8 in Washington, DC
• Kong A, Woodall WG, Zimet G, Reither J, Myers V, Buller D, Starling R, Chilton L, Ginossar T. Improving HPV Vaccine Uptake with Digital Interventions. (presentation)

National Research Society on Alcoholism Annual Scientific Meeting – June 16-20 in San Diego, California
• Sanchez V, Chacon A, Perez F, Reither J. WayToServe-Español: Adapting an Evidence-Based Online Responsible Beverage Server (RBS) Training for Spanish Language Populations in the US Southwest. (poster)

National Cancer Institute Exercise Science and Skin Cancer Prevention Research Meeting — September 26-27 in Washington, DC
Buller D, Walkosz B. Translational Research in Sun Safety in Sports Settings. (presentation)

National Commission on Correctional Health Care Conference – October 12-16 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida
• Loeb S, Myers V, Kitt-Lewis E. Developing and Testing E-Training to Enhance Care of Aged and Dying Prisoners. (poster)

EUSPR Conference and Members’ Meeting – October 24-29 in Lisbon, Portugal
• Miller BA, Rogers V, Byrnes H, Johnson M, Buller DB, Grube J, Berteletti J. Influences of Personal Characteristics on Group-based Club Intervention Outcomes. (presentation)

Colorado Cancer Coalition Annual Symposium — November 8-9 in Lakewood, Colorado
Myers V. Caminemos Juntas: Using Technology and Social Media to Advance Your Mission. (presentation)

American Public Health Association Annual Meeting — November 10-14 in San Diego, California
Buller DB, Woodall WG, Saltz R, Grayson A, Buller MK, Svendsen S. Implementation and Effectiveness of an Online Responsible Vendor Training for Recreational Marijuana Stores in Colorado, Oregon, and Washington State. (presentation)

EUROGIN International Multidisciplinary HPV Congress – December 2-5 in Lisbon, Portugal
Woodall WG. Digital Interventions to Improve HPV Vaccine Uptake: Results and Issues. (presentation)
Woodall WG, Zimet G, Reither J, Kong A, Buller DB, Chilton L, Myers V, Starling R, Ginossar T. Vacteens: Results from Ongoing Trials of Mobile Web Apps to Improve HPV Vaccine Uptake. (poster)
Buller DB, Walkosz B, Berteletti J, Pagoto S, Oleski J, Baker K. Insights on HPV Vaccination from Mothers’ Comments on Facebook Posts in a Randomized Trial. (poster)

The Science of Dissemination & Implementation in Health Annual Conference – December 3-5 in Washington, DC
• Meenan R, Reynolds K, Buller D, Massie K, Berteletti J, Buller MK, Ashley J. Economic evaluation of a sun protection promotion program in California elementary schools. (presentation)
• Loeb S, Myers V, Kitt-Lewis E, Wion RK, Jerrod T, Carter M. Developing Geriatric and End-of-Life E-training For Inmate Peer Caregivers (poster)

Other Highlights & Recognitions

In February, Dr. Valerie Myers, began her tenure as a mentor for the SPRINT program at the National Cancer Institute. She also began serving as a mentor on Dr. Seth Creasy’s K Award entitled, “Linking Temporal Pattern of Modifiable Behaviors to Weight Loss Outcomes”.

Dr. David Buller was a co-author on a chapter in a book that was selected as the 2018 recipient of the Gerald R. Miller Boo Award for Interpersonal Communication from the National Communication Association:

    The book is: D.O. Braithwaite and P. Schrodt (Eds.), Engaging theories in interpersonal communication: Multiple perspectives, 2nd edition (pp. 343-356). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
    The chapter is: Burgoon, J. K., & Buller, D. B. (2015). Interpersonal deception theory: Purposive and interdependent behavior during deceptive interpersonal communication.

Dr. Susan Loeb and Dr. Valerie Myers’ Phase I STTR Project, E-training of Inmate Peer Caregivers for Enhancing Geriatric and End-of-Life Care in Prisons, was selected for inclusion in the NIH Niche Assessment Program for small businesses.

KB received trademark registration through the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office for Train To Tend®.

Way To Serve®, the licensed evidence-based online responsible alcohol server training program owned by KB and its research collaborators, achieved a significant milestone by selling 75,000 trainings since it entered the market.

KB, along with Rocky Mountain Sunscreen and the Colorado Skin Cancer Task Force, offered free UV camera photographs and skin cancer prevention education to attendees at the Snowsports Industries of America Snow Show in January and the Outdoor Retailer Summer Market in July. Both trade shows were held at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver, Colorado.

Beginning in September, KB made its Grade K-5 sun safety curriculum, Sunny Days Healthy Ways®, available free to the public in response to the Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Prevent Skin Cancer.

KB was recognized on Colorado Biz Magazine’s Top 100 Woman-Owned Companies list. KB landed at #48 for 2018. Colorado Biz Magazine ranked Klein Buendel #142 of Top 250 Private Companies for 2018.

Here’s to a Very Healthy and Happy New Year!