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Bilingual Web App to Improve HPV Vaccine Uptake

Bilingual Web App to Improve HPV Vaccine Uptake

Dr. W. Gill Woodall, Klein Buendel Senior Scientist, presented findings from the Vacteens/Vacuna Adolescente Project at the virtual 33rd International Papillomavirus Conference & Basic Science, Clinical and Public Health Workshops (IPVC), July 20-24, 2020.

The uptake of HPV vaccine in the United States remains substantially below the Healthy People 2020 goal of 80% series completion, particularly for young adolescents, when immunogenic response to the vaccine is strongest. Physician and clinic-based interventions have shown some limited positive effect on vaccine uptake. However, parental barriers to HPV vaccination may be addressed by digital interventions, such as smartphone applications, that are tailored to their concerns. Potential parental barriers include confusion, uncertainty, and misinformation about HPV vaccine schedule, safety, and effectiveness.

A research project was conducted to test whether digital information delivered to parents in a community setting may be an effective way to help reach HPV vaccine uptake goals in the United States. Diffusion of Innovations Theory principles were used to guide the development of the Vacteens/Vacuna Adolescente mobile app in English and Spanish. The app was designed  to encourage HPV vaccination in New Mexico, an ethnically-diverse state with insufficient vaccine uptake. Parents and adolescents were recruited from pediatric clinics in New Mexico to a randomized trial evaluating the mobile web app, which focused on daughters (ages 11-14). Parents were randomized to receive either the Vacteens/VacunaAdolescente mobile web app or the usual and customary online HPV vaccination pamphlet from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Adolescent vaccine records were collected for daughters at a 9-month assessment point. Vaccine uptake results from the trial found that parents who received the Vacteens/VacunaAdolescente web app were significantly more likely to have their daughters vaccinated.

This research was funded by grants from PCORI and the National Cancer Institute (CA210125; Dr. W. Gill Woodall, Principal Investigator). Dr. Woodall’s collaborators include Dr. Alberta Kong and Dr. Lance Chilton from the University of New Mexico, Dr. Greg Zimet from Indiana University, and Jeannyfer Reither, Dr. David Buller, and Dr. Valerie Myers from Klein Buendel.

HPV VACCINATION RATES IN A TRIAL TESTING A SOCIAL MEDIA CAMPAIGN WITH MOTHERS OF TEENAGE DAUGHTERS

HPV VACCINATION RATES IN A TRIAL TESTING A SOCIAL MEDIA CAMPAIGN WITH MOTHERS OF TEENAGE DAUGHTERS

Dr. David Buller, Director of Research from Klein Buendel, presented findings from the Health Chat Project at the virtual 33rd International Papillomavirus Conference & Basic Science, Clinical and Public Health Workshops (IPVC), July 20-24, 2020.

Parental decisions on HPV vaccine uptake in the United States are influenced by information and misinformation about the vaccine in social media. Mothers’ reports on vaccination of their adolescent daughters were examined in an evaluation of a social media adolescent health campaign.

For this intervention, 881 mothers from 34 states were recruited into a randomized controlled trial evaluating a social media adolescent health campaign. Eligibility criteria included having a daughter aged 14-17, in state without a complete ban on indoor tanning by minors, using a Facebook account one or more times a week, completing the baseline survey, and joining the Facebook group. The campaign included didactic and narrative posts some of which promoted HPV vaccination, such as the need for vaccine, percent of adolescents vaccinated, and how HPV vaccines are decreasing infection rates. It was delivered through two Facebook private groups differing on inclusion of indoor tanning or prescription drug mis-use posts .

At baseline, nearly two-thirds of mothers reported that their daughters had been vaccinated for HPV. HPV vaccine uptake increased during the 12-month social media campaign. At the 12-month posttest, nearly 8% more mothers reported that daughters had been vaccinated for HPV. The increase appeared to be largest in completion of the multi-dose series. Uptake increased among older and more educated mothers and those with a family history of skin cancer. Mothers’ reports of HPV vaccine uptake were corroborated by daughters. Effective strategies are needed in social media to promote HPV vaccines and counter misinformation about and resistance to them.

This research is funded by a grant from the National Cancer Institute (CA192652; Dr. David Buller, Klein Buendel, and Dr. Sherry Pagoto, University of Connecticut, Multiple Principal Investigators). Collaborators include Jessica Oleski from the University of Connecticut, Dr. Katie Baker and Dr. Joel Hillhouse from East Tennessee State University, Dr. Kim Henry from Colorado State University, and Dr. Barbara Walkosz and Julia Berteletti from Klein Buendel.

Effects of an Online Responsible Vendor Training for Recreational Marijuana Stores

Effects of an Online Responsible Vendor Training for Recreational Marijuana Stores

The Train To Tend® responsible marijuana vendor (RMV) training research team recently published results from online RMV training on responsible sales for recreational marijuana store personnel as an abstract for the Annals of Behavioral Medicine. The Train To Tend research team is led by Dr. David Buller from Klein Buendel who would have presented the findings at the 41st Annual Meeting and Scientific Sessions of the Society of Behavioral Medicine in San Francisco, had the conference been held as planned.

Recreational marijuana regulations have been designed, in part, to ensure that cannabis products are sold only to adults over the age of 21 who provide state-approved identification (ID). The Train to Tend online RMV training was developed with input from state regulators and recreational marijuana store personnel to train store staff. The training consists of five modules with interactive learning elements that cover state laws, ID checking, health effects of marijuana, driving under the influence, refusal of sales to intoxicated customers, and store processes, such as product labeling and tracking.

A sample of 175 recreational marijuana stores in Colorado and Washington were selected for a randomized controlled trial with sales to pseudo-underage customers. Of the 175 stores, 75 were assigned to the control condition (usual and customary training) and the remaining 100 were given the online RMV training. At baseline, sales of marijuana to pseudo-underage buyers were refused at 93% of 349 visits to stores across the two states. After adjusting for store characteristics, there was no difference in change in refusal rates between treatment groups from baseline, to a 3-month posttest, or a 9-month posttest. For the intervention stores, training uptake was not related to refusal rate and nearly all recreational cannabis stores refused sales to young patrons who failed to produce appropriate ID.

This research was funded by a grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse at the National Institutes of Health (DA038933; Dr. David Buller, Principal Investigator). Co-authors include Dr. Robert Saltz from the Prevention Research Center at the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation; Dr. Gary Cutter from the University of Alabama, Birmingham; and Dr. Gill Woodall, Andrew Grayson, Mary Buller, Sierra Svendsen, and Lucia Liu from Klein Buendel.

Mothers’ Support for Laws Restricting Indoor Tanning by Minors

Mothers’ Support for Laws Restricting Indoor Tanning by Minors

The Health Chat research team published some findings related to indoor tanning from their Facebook-delivered cancer risk reduction intervention and randomized trial with mothers and teen daughters as an abstract in the Annals of Behavioral Medicine. The research team would have presented the work at the 41st Annual Meeting and Scientific Sessions of the Society of Behavioral Medicine in San Francisco, had the conference been held as planned.

Indoor tanning is associated with increased risk for melanoma, especially in young women. Several states restrict indoor tanning by minors or require parental permission. The authors of this abstract hypothesize that mothers’ awareness of state laws related to indoor tanning by youth may reduce their permissiveness for daughters to use tanning facilities.

A total of 777 mothers (and their daughters) from 34 states that do not ban indoor tanning participated in the trial. Less than 20% of mothers (and fewer daughters) accurately reported whether their state has an age restriction or parental permission requirement for minors to indoor tan. More than 50% of the mothers supported banning indoor tanning by minors. However, the mothers reported varying levels of advocacy that they would be willing to demonstrate related to enacting state-level policy to restrict indoor tanning by minors (e.g., sign a petition, contact an elected representative, testify to a state legislative committee). 

The authors conclude that: “Efforts to inform mothers and daughters may be needed to create a norm against indoor tanning, to prevent moms from permitting indoor tanning by daughters, and to build support for further restrictions on minors’ access.”

This research is funded by a grant from the National Cancer Institute (CA192652; Dr. David Buller, Klein Buendel, and Dr. Sherry Pagoto, University of Connecticut, Multiple Principal Investigators). Co-authors include Dr. Katie Baker, Dr. Joel Hillhouse, and Jessica Bibeau from East Tennessee State University; Dr. Kim Henry from Colorado State University; and Dr. Barbara Walkosz and Julia Berteletti from Klein Buendel.

E-Training to Enhance the Care of Aged and Dying Prisoners

E-Training to Enhance the Care of Aged and Dying Prisoners

The health care needs of aged, chronically ill, and dying inmates in correctional settings face growing demands. The Enhancing Care for the Aged and Dying in Prisons (ECAD-P) research team published insights from a geriatric care learning program for corrections staff as an abstract for the Annals of Behavioral Medicine. The ECAD-P research team is led by Dr. Susan Loeb from Penn State University and Dr. Valerie Myers from Klein Buendel. They would have presented the work at the 41st Annual Meeting and Scientific Sessions of the Society of Behavioral Medicine in San Francisco, had the conference been held as planned.

The number of older inmates in the United States continues to grow and best practices for managing geriatric issues and end-of-life (EOL) care have not been adapted for use in corrections settings. In response, ECAD-P team has developed a computer-based learning program for corrections staff comprised of six modules that address EOL and geriatric care concerns in prisons.

After conducting two rounds of usability testing at two prisons in different states, the ECAD-P program entered full-scale testing at seven state prisons. A total of 241 individuals consented to participate and 173 individuals completed all training modules and posttests. Outcomes revealed that the ECAD-P training program was acceptable, feasible, and usable in the corrections staff setting. The research team also found that corrections staff improved their knowledge of geriatric and EOL care of inmates overall after completing the training.

This research was funded by a Small Business Technology Transfer grant to Klein Buendel from the National Institute on Aging at the National Institutes of Health (AG049570; Dr. Susan Loeb and Dr. Valerie Myers, Multiple Principal Investigators). Collaborators and co-authors on this abstract also include Dr. Erin Kitt-Lewis from Penn State University; Dr. Rachel Wion from the Indiana University School of Nursing (formerly Penn State University); Julie Murphy from the King’s College Nursing Program; and Tiffany Jerrod, formerly of Klein Buendel.

Health Misinformation in Participant Comments in a Facebook-Delivered Cancer Risk Reduction Intervention

Health Misinformation in Participant Comments in a Facebook-Delivered Cancer Risk Reduction Intervention

Little is known about how how participants in a health intervention share health misinformation via social media platforms. The Health Chat research team published insights from their Facebook-delivered cancer risk reduction intervention and randomized trial with mothers and teen daughters as an abstract for the Society of Behavioral Medicine (SBM). The lead author, Kelsey Arroyo, from the University of Connecticut, would have presented the work at the 41st Annual Meeting and Scientific Sessions of the Society of Behavioral Medicine in San Francisco, had the conference been held as planned.

For this study, the researchers examined 175 comments made to 42 randomly-selected Facebook posts on different health topics such as substance use, indoor tanning, vaccines, mental health by study participants. The Facebook groups were moderated by health professionals. The participant comments were coded as sharing an opinion, a personal experience, an intention, or information. Comments were analyzed for whether misinformation was conveyed. According to the authors, “misinformation was defined as a fact, belief, opinion, or action that is not supported by scientific evidence.”

Analysis showed that more than three-quarters of comments shared a personal experience. Overall, less than one-fifth of the comments conveyed misinformation, and more than half of the misinformation was conveyed in comments that shared a personal experience.

This research is funded by a grant from the National Cancer Institute (CA192652; Dr. David Buller, Klein Buendel, and Dr. Sherry Pagoto, University of Connecticut, Multiple Principal Investigators). Collaborators and co-authors on the SBM abstract include Kelsey Arroyo, Jared Goetz, and Dr. Molly Waring from the University of Connecticut; Dr. Katie Baker and Dr. Joel Hillhouse from East Tennessee State University; Dr. Kim Henry from Colorado State University; Dr. Jerod Stapleton formerly from the Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey; and Julia Berteletti and Dr. Barbara Walkosz from Klein Buendel.

Lessons Learned: Accessing Sites for Correctional Research

Lessons Learned: Accessing Sites for Correctional Research

Dr. Erin Kitt-Lewis from Penn State University presented insights into accessing correctional facilities for research at the 32nd Annual Scientific Sessions virtual conference of the Eastern Nursing Research Society on March 26-27, 2020. Klein Buendel Senior Scientist, Dr. Valerie Myers, was a co-author on the presentation.

Despite the imperative to engage in research in corrections, researchers face many challenges due to the restrictive nature of this setting. Dr. Kitt-Lewis shared many of the lessons learned by this collaborative research team as they worked to secure diverse prison and jail settings to research, develop, and test the Enhancing Care for the Aged and Dying in Prison program.

Lessons learned included the discovery of contextually-specific constraints such as the closing or consolidating of services or facilities, managing staffing constraints, relocating staff, ascertaining and adhering to policies and administrative directives, and working within the guidelines of the review board of the correctional system.

Establishing and maintaining relationships with key stakeholders in corrections were also important aspects of this research. In her presentation, Dr. Kitt-Lewis discussed developing networking opportunities such as connecting via social media like LinkedIn, attending corrections conferences, and discussing potential research opportunities to help build relationships with key stakeholders and decision-makers. Additional perceptions from the field included identifying potential barriers or constraints to accessing correctional sites, and sustaining relationships post-research via ongoing communication such as sharing periodic updates, final reports, and publications with partners.

The correctional system has often been called a “closed” system due to the difficulty faced by researchers in attempting to access and conduct research. However, establishing well-defined strategies to conduct research in the system appears to create efficiency and promote much needed health-related research in the correction setting. Research outcomes that are contextually-specific can support and foster equitable care for people who are incarcerated.

This research was funded by a Small Business Technology Transfer grant to Klein Buendel from the National Institute on Aging at the National Institutes of Health (AG049570; Dr. Susan Loeb and Dr. Valerie Myers, Multiple Principal Investigators). Collaborators on the work presented, in addition to Dr. Erin Kitt-Lewis, include Dr. Susan Loeb and Kaléi Kowalchik from Penn State University; Dr. Rachel Wion from Indiana University School of Nursing; Julie Murphy from King College Nursing Program; and Dr. Valerie Myers and Tiffany Jerrod from Klein Buendel.

Implementing E-Training for Geriatric and End-of-Life Care in Corrections

Implementing E-Training for Geriatric and End-of-Life Care in Corrections

Dr. Susan Loeb from The Pennsylvania State University College of Nursing is presenting on the creation of a computer-based learning (CBL) program for corrections staff at the 32nd Annual Scientific Sessions virtual conference of the Eastern Nursing Research Society on March 26-27, 2020. Klein Buendel Senior Scientist, Dr. Valerie Myers, is a co-author on the presentation.

Experts in corrections have identified the care of older individuals who are incarcerated as a high priority area for research and policy. Therefore, there is a need to provide evidence-based training tailored to frontline corrections personnel who are charged with the care and oversight of aged and dying incarcerated individuals. In response, the research team developed, implemented, and tested a CBL program that aligned with contextual environment constraints and the infrastructure-specific needs of corrections.

The virtual presentation will describe how the adoption mechanisms and support systems were integrated from set up to full-scale usability testing of the CBL program, Enhancing Care for the Aged and Dying in Prison (ECAD-P) for corrections staff. Specifically, factors that affect adoption and support systems were identified, examined and implemented at each phase of the development and implementation process of ECAD-P. In the Set-Up phase, the format of a paper-pencil toolkit was not sustainable for long-term, broad dissemination of the program, so support systems were evaluated to determine the capabilities of CBL. Throughout the development, Expert and Community Advisory Boards critically examined the content and programming measures of the product to ensure the product complied with usual practices and institutional constraints.

During testing, small scale usability-testing was conducted to determine human capacity, infrastructure capabilities, reporting systems, and program design and function. In going to full-scale, large-scale usability testing provided valuable insights on implementation considerations, such as leadership, communication, policy, and culture of institution. Consideration of adoption mechanisms and support systems ultimately allowed for researchers to refine ECAD-P for future, effective, large-scale dissemination.

This research was funded by a Small Business Technology Transfer grant to Klein Buendel from the National Institute on Aging at the National Institutes of Health (AG049570; Dr. Susan Loeb and Dr. Valerie Myers, Multiple Principal Investigators). Collaborators on the work presented include Dr. Erin Kitt-Lewis and Kaléi Kowalchik from The Pennsylvania State University College of Nursing; Dr. Rachel Wion from Indiana University School of Nursing; Julie Murphy from King College Nursing Program; and Dr. Valerie Myers and Tiffany Jerrod from Klein Buendel.

A Tablet-delivered Intervention to Reduce Risky Behavior in Adolescents

A Tablet-delivered Intervention to Reduce Risky Behavior in Adolescents

Klein Buendel collaborator, Dr. Christopher Houck from Rhode Island Hospital, will present findings from Project TRAC at the Society of Research on Adolescence Biennial Meeting in San Diego, California, March 19-21, 2020. His presentation will also include a demonstration of the targeted games used in the intervention.

The team initially developed and validated an Emotion Regulation (ER) intervention for reducing risk behaviors among early adolescents. Project TRAC showed that adolescents who learned about sexual health information with ER content were significantly less likely to transition to sexual activity. Despite the promise of targeting ER during early adolescence to prevent risk behaviors, discussions with community partners suggest that the original facilitator-led small-group format is difficult to sustain. Disseminating this prevention approach required a format that was less reliant on specialized training that could be easily implemented to an individual format. Therefore, through advisory panels of early adolescents and consultation from a group of experts in the field, Project TRAC was translated from a small-group format to a tablet-delivered, game-based program.

Acceptability testing took place with ten adolescents followed by 85 adolescents who participated in a small randomized pilot trial to assess the feasibility of the digital intervention as well as preliminary assessment of short-term changes in ER. Those randomized to the intervention condition completed four computerized modules that taught emotion concepts through games and instructional videos. Control participants were waitlisted to complete the intervention at the end of the study and all adolescents completed surveys at baseline and one month later.

Participants positively rated the intervention with a majority completing all four modules. Intervention participants self-reported significant improvements, including emotional awareness, perceived access to ER strategies, use of the strategies taught in the intervention, intentions to use these strategies, emotional knowledge, and perceptions that emotions are changeable. They also reported a moderate effect of poorer perceptions of abilities to manage positive emotions.

Results suggest that a tablet-based intervention providing ER training was able to affect adolescents’ use of ER behaviors, understanding of emotions, and perceptions of emotional competence. Linking ER training to specific areas of risk (sexual health, substance use, or violence prevention) in the developmental window when risk behaviors are beginning, such as early adolescence, may prevent risk behaviors for many young people. Dissemination of evidence-based interventions through tablet formats may also improve the reach of effective interventions.

This research is funded by a grant from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (HD089979; Dr. Christopher Houck, Principal Investigator). Other collaborators include Wendy Hadley from the University of Oregon; Crosby Modrowski and Kelsey Bala from Brown University; Brittany Wickham from Villanova University; and Dr. Valerie Myers and Tiffany Jerrod from Klein Buendel.

An Implementation Model for the Cost-effective Scale-up of the Sun Safe Workplaces Program

An Implementation Model for the Cost-effective Scale-up of the Sun Safe Workplaces Program

Dr. David Buller and Dr. Barbara Walkosz from Klein Buendel presented a poster on a new implementation model for the cost-effective scale-up of an occupational sun protection program at the 12th Annual Conference on the Science of Dissemination and Implementation in Health in Washington, DC, December 4-6, 2019. The poster was nominated for Best Poster from the Prevention and Public Health Division.

Scale-up is the effort to increase the impact of successful programs to benefit more people on a lasting basis. Scale-up efforts must increase reach, retain effectiveness, and lower costs to provide greater access to benefits and close the research-to-practice gap between effective programs and real-world application. This project is studying the nationwide scale-up of an occupational sun safety intervention, Sun Safe Workplaces, with state Departments of Transportation (DOTs), a public works sector with thousands of outdoor workers.

Costs of national distribution can be daunting and influence intervention intensity and program effectiveness. Identifying cost-effective scale-up strategies is essential for moving research into practice. The new framework draws upon existing implementation models, including those developed for occupational health and safety, and operationalizes implementation for scale-up within RE-AIM. The RE-AIM framework was adapted for this new framework by incorporating cost as a primary factor.

In a randomized trial, Sun Safe Workplaces (SSW) is assessing implementation rate and costs associated with two methods of scaling-up SSW. The original intervention depended on personal visits with managers, materials promoting sun protection policies and education, in-person sun safety training for employee groups, and on-going follow-up communication with managers supporting sun safety (SSW-IP), a resource-intensive form of intervention. Now SSW-IP is being contrasted to a scale-up strategy that uses web-based and telephone conferencing, responsive training platforms, and electronic resources for virtual contacts and training (SSW-T). Technology-based programs have the potential to deliver standardized, engaging content and increase portability while decreasing cost of delivery to enable reaching more employers when scaled-up to nationwide distribution. Districts within DOTs are randomized to one of the two scale-up methods. The SSW-IP and SSW-T interventions are being delivered in 21 state DOTs with 141 districts.

This research is funded by a grant from the National Cancer Institute (CA134705; Dr. David Buller and Dr. Barbara Walkosz, Multiple Principal Investigators). Additional poster coauthors include Dr. Richard Meenan from the Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research; and Mary Buller, Rachel Eye, Andrew Grayson, and Savanna Olivas from Klein Buendel.